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International Society for Horticultural Science

Horticulture Research International

Netherlands

General info
For questions and/or remarks regarding the content of these pages, feel free to contact the respective ISHS Council representatives who not only represent their country on ISHS Council but who are also invited to maintain the information included in the ISHS HRI Directory pages. For details on how to update your own details we refer to the FAQ pages on this site.

Climate
The prevailing wind is from the South west (yearly average speed varies from 3.4 to 6.4 m/sec) and brings mild air from the North Sea. The yearly average relative humidity is 81-85%. The yearly average temperature ranges from 9.0 to 10.4 °C (January: 2.0-3.8; July 16.5-17.7) and the yearly average precipitation ranges from 710 to 830 mm. It rains 7% o fthe time, and the sun shines 32% of the daytime. The Netherlands thus has a temperate oceanic climate which is well suited to horticulture for much of the year.

Geography
The Netherlands are rather flat, the western part being below sea level and protected by dunes and dikes. Fertile clay soils occur in the western and northern part of the country and along the large rivers. Sandy and sandy-loam soils can be found in the eastern and southern part of the country.

Horticulture
All aspects of horticulture can be found in The Netherlands: arboriculture, fruit growing, flower culture, vegetable production under glass and in the open, mushroom production and flower bulb culture.
Cultures under glass (vegetables, flowers) are concentrated in the western part of The Netherlands, flower bulb cultures behind the dunes, strawberry growing is concentrated on the sandy soils in the south and mushroom growing is practiced in the south-east. Fruit, mainly apple and pear, is grown on clay soil in the south-west, along the large rivers and in the centre of the Netherlands and on loam soil in the south-east. Arboriculture is on peat-soil in the centre of the Netherlands and on sandy soils. Vegetable growing is practiced in all regions.

Distribution of Horticulture
Cultures under glass (vegetables, flowers) are concentrated in the western part of The Netherlands, flower bulb cultures behind the dunes, strawberry growing is concentrated on the sandy soils in the south and mushroom growing is practiced in the south-east. Fruit, mainly apple and pear, is grown on clay soil in the south-west, along the large rivers and in the centre of the Netherlands and on loam soil in the south-east. Arboriculture is on peat-soil in the centre of the Netherlands and on sandy soils. Vegetable growing is practiced in all regions.

Research Thrusts
The two major research thrusts are the Ministry of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Fisheries and the Growers Organisations. Several private enterprises have scientific programs on horticultural research.

Nature of Institutes
Horticultural research nowadays is directed to sustainable and cost-effective growing systems, and is primarily conducted by two groups of institutions:
1. DLO Research institutes and Groups and Departments of the State University at Wageningen, recently merged into Wageningen University and Research Centre(Wageningen UR);
2. Horticultural research stations, divided over the country. These stations have merded into PPO, which is part of Wageningen UR
Besides, a few private enterprises for seed production do have their own horticultural research activities.

Organisations / Institutes:
Wageningen UR
Research Station for Floriculture and Glasshouse Vegetables (PBG)
Research Station for Nursery Stock
Research Centre for Insect Pollination and Beekeeping 'Ambrosiushoeve'
Mushroom Experimental Station
Station for Applied Research on Arable Farming and Field Production of Vegetables (PAV)
Bulb Research Centre (Including: Centre for Plant Tissue Culture Research)
Fruit Research Station (FPO)
Plant Protection Service (PD)
Bruinsma Seeds B.V.


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